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  • 0 What should you not miss when visiting Paris?

    • by admin
    • 16-11-2020
    0.00 of 0 votes

    You woke up in London apartment and said - hey we go to Paris! What should you not miss? The places you can't miss in Paris Let's suppose that you are going to visit Paris for 3 days, either for work or enjoying a short vacation, but you want to take the opportunity to know what this city has to offer. Would you know which places are essential to know? Do you know exactly what to see in Paris? Top 10 places of interest in Paris that you should not miss1. Delight yourself in Montmartre and its cafesIt's easy to get lost in the steep, cobbled streets of one of the most iconic neighborhoods in France. You will be impressed by the number of tourist attractions it has to offer. Check out the works of street vendors, marvel at the impressive Sacré Coeur Basilica or the tourist-favorite cabaret, the Moulin Rouge. After a busy day of sightseeing, photographs and several kilometers walked, the best option will be to have a delicious coffee in the street of the most visited cafes in the area, famous for their traditional decoration and Parisian music. Because there it is romantic until the afternoon coffee! 2. You must know the Cathedral of Notre-DameMore than just a medieval Catholic cathedral, Notre Dame is majestic both for its architecture and its cultural aspect. Only in the architectural field it stands out for proudly bearing the title of “One of the best examples of French Gothic architecture” with giant vaults, intricate rose windows and colorful stained glass windows. It is practically impossible not to get lost in every detail and the cathedral is considered a cultural icon. Surely you know the work of the famous writer, Victor Hugo: "The hunchback of Notre Dame." If you are a fanatic reader of this type of literary classics, you cannot pass through Paris without visiting the cathedral that housed the Hunchback! 3. Visit the Georges Pompidou National Center of Art and Culture (Center Pompidou)This series of modern architecture buildings houses the Bibliothèque Publique d'information (Public Information Library) and also the largest modern art museum in all of Europe, with an incredible number of more than 50 thousand works of art registered to date. With impressive art presentations every year, you can lose hours and hours in corridors full of great names: Marcel Duchamp, Clément or Paul Cézanne among hundreds if not thousands of other great names in the history of art. 4. Get lost in the Louvre MuseumWith more than 38,000 objects, it tells the history of modern art, also considered one of the most visited museums in the world, a cultural jewel for the French. The museum is located in the Louvre Palace, and has a historical past worthy of a movie. Walking its corridors you can enjoy: Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan, Roman antiquities ...Impressive sculpturesDecorative arts, prints, drawings ...A wide catalog of art in the heart of the city is at your disposal! Ready to appreciate with your own eyes the Mona Lisa, the Liberty leading the people or the Venus de Milo? Impressive! 5. Get to know the iconic Eiffel TowerYou can't come back from Paris without taking a picture with the most visited tower in the country! With more than 6.91 million people who decide to climb it each year, it is the most visited paid monument in history. And is not for less! Surrounded by a quiet park where you will perceive a great tourist activity, you can choose to know its interior levels until reaching more than 324 meters in height. But don't worry, there is an elevator! You can go up it and enjoy the best view in all of France. Definitely! 6. Stroll along the Seine RiverSurprising your partner with a romantic walk up the Eiffel Tower can be a pleasant surprise, but you can double the bet. Very close to the most famous tower in Paris, you will be able to see the River Seine, being able to take a magical boat trip and appreciate Paris from another point of view. In addition, you also have the option of having a drink while you spend the afternoon sailing and enjoying with your loved ones. A walk that many travelers have described as “Parisian warmth”. But it does not end there, when you get off the boat you will see hundreds of young artists who have the perfect space to paint and sell their works of art. You can finish the tour by buying a piece of authentic Parisian art! 7. Appreciate the city of lightsParis is famous for offering spectacular nights. It is almost mandatory to walk through the cobbled streets in the middle of the night and observe the city decorated with thousands of lights, which give a tremendously romantic aspect. In addition, being a tourist area, the Parisian night has many bars and nightclubs open 24 hours a day for all those who love dancing and fun. But if yours is not this type of environment, do not worry! There are hundreds of things to do when the sun goes down, like enjoying the great restaurants with the impressive fine dining. One of the most typical dishes, crepes. And one of the most prominent places to enjoy them, the Breizh Café, open 24 hours a day and known for having a wide range of flavors and combinations. 8. Visit the Bastille OperaOne of the oldest traditions in the city. Enjoy a classic opera concert under the tutelage of the best singers in the city, interpreting mythical characters. Under a classic and traditional atmosphere, for just 5 euros you can enjoy them. A great show in the center of the city and in velvety seats! 9. Another symbol of the city: the Arc de TriumpheOne of the most famous monuments in Paris. Considered a symbol of honor and patriotic pride for the French, it commemorates those who fell during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars. With the names of famous people carved in stone, below is the famous tomb of the unnamed soldier, where the eternal flame burns to commemorate all those soldiers who fell in battle who could never be found or identified. 10. Parc des Buttes ChaumontNamed by tourists as the most beautiful park in the entire country. They are so right! It has areas full of trees, bushes and beautiful flowers. This park has everything to impress you, with small waterfalls and even a Romanesque temple called: Temple of the Sibyl. Near it you can see puppet theaters among other artistic expressions. Incredible! Accommodation in this city is extremely expensive if you want to find something central. Why not save on accommodation? With our home exchange system you can offer your home to a Parisian who wants to visit your city and on those days visit Paris enjoying the comforts of their home. And the experience of living like a local is unmatched. In addition, your home exchange partner can give you many of their tips so that you can enjoy the city even more.   THE BEST PLACES TO SEE THE SKY OF PARIS In Paris, there are many places, bars, restaurants and also monuments, which promise a beautiful view over the capital, and there are many who keep their promise. From Montmartre, from the top of the Eiffel tour or from the Montparnasse tour, the panorama is incredible and nobody will tell you otherwise. But since the true Parisian spirit is insatiable, as well as that of tourists, some want to see the sky of Paris from another perspective. It is rare that those who want to see Paris from another perspective are disappointed with the many surprises that exist in the city. Of course there are the most sought-after rooftops of the moment (le Perchoir, the W of the Warwick Champs-Elysées hotel, le Georges in Beaubourg…). There the view is beautiful, but it is difficult to find a place. Not forgetting that it can be a bit tough on the budget! But other less famous places are worth a visit. In addition to the rooftops, a nice corner, a well-located square or a park with a wide view is enough to enjoy the Parisian sky in a different way. If you like Paris, don't miss it: you are guaranteed an unprecedented panorama and a pleasant moment! • The 43 Up on the RoofThe address is not secret, but it is still one of the most discreet rooftops in the capital. In the 6th arrondissement, right next to Saint-Michel, the view over Paris is breathtaking, and it also gives you the delightful feeling of walking on the rooftops of the capital.Roof of the Holiday Inn, 4, rue Danton, 6e • The bar-terrace of the LouxorIt is already a classic! Reopened in 2013, Le Louxor, with its studied programming, has managed to satisfy the cinephiles of northern Paris. Its terrace-bar also offers a further touch. Here you can discover the Barbès district from a very different perspective, with the Sacré-Cœur as a backdrop.170, boulevard de Magenta, 10e • La butte BergeyreYou can see Paris from other places than Montmartre! Near the Buttes-Chaumont, at the top of the hill, there are some narrow streets of residential areas from which you have an incredible and unprecedented view over Paris. You can even see vineyards, but hardly any tourists!Rue Georges-Lardennois, 19e • Les Ombres, musée du quai BranlyThe combination of culture and restaurant tends to reconcile unanimity. And with an incredible view over Paris, you can be sure to have a delicious time. A recipe that works very well for Les Ombres, a restaurant located on the roof-terrace of the Musée du Quai Branly. A must.27, quai Branly, 7e • Parc de BellevilleFrom its culminating point, your view over Paris is astonishing and it is much better than on some terraces that cannot offer you such a panorama! A place not to be missed during a walk through eastern Paris.47, rue des Couronnes, 20e  

  • 0 Going to England and start living in London?

    • by admin
    • 12-11-2020
    0.00 of 0 votes

    Going to live in a new country inevitably involves decoding a new culture, and making a few missteps! Even when the country in question is only on the other side of the Channel, not so far from where I grew up. I left France for England (London at the time) 6 years ago now, but it is with pleasure and, I hope, humor, that I rethought all the small mistakes made in the first months following my arrival on British soil. Whether it's pub culture, popular sports, the country's cultural identity, or culinary and clothing habits, here's a list of the blunders that have punctuated my life among the English. I forgot? I'd love to know if you find yourself on this list, or if you would add more. Keep in touch through the comments at the bottom of the article, and happy reading! 1. Not knowing how to greet peopleWhen I arrived in England, fresh from France, I still had the reflex of trying to kiss everyone and say hello. I knew she was not part of the mores of the country, but I didn’t realize how uncomfortable she could make the British. Very quickly, I didn't quite know how to greet people, because foreigners may laugh at the kiss, it still simplifies things quite a bit (despite the existence, it is true, of regional variants in France) . In England, you can greet by shaking hands even at a dinner with friends, by giving a “hug”, by giving a kind of half-kiss (on one cheek, or sometimes two, but only to people with whom one is close), or by doing nothing at all, arms dangling. An Englishwoman told me recently that she did not know how to greet people in her own country because the codes are not clear, even between Brits. Awkward! 2. Don't pay for a pub tourWhen I started out in London, when I went out to the pub with friends or colleagues, I paid for my drinks “à la française”, that is to say only mine. I did not understand that drinks are paid per round, and that everyone has to pay for one regularly. The importance of this was revealed to me the day I heard from a friend of a friend, with a frown of the band, that he always managed not to pay for tours. Basically, never offering a tour of England is tantamount to 'drinking in the eye', and is in bad taste. It can be expensive, but it is customary: ignore it at your own risk! The only exception: those who don't drink alcohol can pretty much fall through the cracks, since they are seen as not being obligated to pay beers to everyone if they only order a Coke (which is actually worth the same price as a pint in England, pretty much). 3. Forget that cricket is a real sportBefore I came to the English, I vaguely confused croquet and cricket, and although I was aware that the latter existed for real, I had no idea that it was a sport followed by millions. people across several countries (especially those of the Commonwealth), with leagues, championships, stars, endless hours of television broadcasting (a cricket match can last up to 5 days, at the rate of 8 hours of game per day. Yes, you read that correctly), and heated discussions in the pub by very committed fans. 4. Call the whole country "England"Like everyone else, I learned in school that the UK is made up of 4 nations (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland). But I hadn't understood how much they could be different from each other in their accents and cultural identities, and that they are not interchangeable within a discussion. I sometimes used the word "England" interchangeably to designate the United Kingdom, while England only designates this small southern part of the country, which has its own legal existence, separate from the 3 other nations. Many British people took me back, gently explaining to me that I also couldn't tell a person that they were “English” if they were in fact “Welsh” (Welsh), and that these 4 nations represented almost 4 independent countries, but with an underlying sense of global identity all the same. You'll notice that I'm using both the terms England and UK in this article, but that's because technically I've only ever lived in England within the UK. So I am not at fault! 5. Get on the bus through the middle doorIn England, the rule is strict: you get on the bus through the front door, the one where the driver is located, you get out through the middle door, but you never get on through the latter! The only exception being wheelchairs and strollers, after advising the driver. I caused some little scandal as I walked up the middle door when I arrived in England, in good faith, wondering why everyone was waiting stupidly in line… I quickly understood. 6. Not understanding the “dates”This only applies to those who have had the pleasure of being single in the UK, or other English speaking countries: succeeding in establishing a love life by following the rules of the natives can leave, at first, slightly perplexed. The system of 'dates' in particular was difficult for me to understand, because in the UK they are real institutions. We “date” there at all costs, with a lot of rules, including, jumbled up: to be (very) beautiful for the date, to let the man pay (if he is English it often ends like that, but of course you can offer to share the bill), accept the “date” before you even know if you like the person, and accept the fact that you can go on a “date” with someone without ever hearing from you once the date ended, after spending a whole evening and sometimes an extra movie in conversation with someone. "Dates" are a kind of first job interview before you've even looked at the candidate's resume. We decide over dinner whether the person will be entitled to a second interview, and if not, we can take the liberty of disappearing on the sly. The sentimental jungle! 7. Confuse fries, crisps and crispsA classic, and it's even worse if you've lived in other English speaking countries that use all of these words differently within the English language. In the United Kingdom, fries refer to thin “French-style” fries, crisps are large, thick English fries often served by default in the pub (but which are different from potatoe wedges, be careful), and crisps are chips. On the other hand, in the United States, crisps are crisps, as in France, and not English crisps (thick fries). You are lost ? It's normal. It's a minefield, so be careful where you step when ordering at a restaurant: check out my little beginner's glossary! 8. Want to have dinner before the pub partyTypical error of the Frenchy who arrives: proposing to meet colleagues at the pub around 8 p.m., after having dinner. You upset the rules of the game, which are very clear: we start drinking very early directly out of the office, on Friday evenings sometimes at 5 p.m., and we dine when hunger devours our guts, usually a little tipsy around 8:30 p.m. or 9 p.m., in the most civilized scenarios. In more extreme cases, we dine in the middle of the night in our neighborhood kebab. On the positive side, however: starting with an extended aperitif at 5 or 6 p.m. often means that the evening does not end too late, which can also be pleasant to enjoy, for example, your weekend. 9. Believe that the royal family is not importantAs a good Republican, I really believed that the royal family was neither popular nor unanimous, and that the British generally had to want to move from a monarchy to a republic. Of course, the Royal Family had some setbacks during Lady Di's day, or faced with other decisions that were unpopular and too conservative for their time (who else watched “The Crown”?), But I didn't. have so far met only two Englishmen in my immediate circle who have told me openly that they are Republicans and that they believe the monarchy is an outdated and unjust symbol. Many people, not necessarily zealous, have told me that they don't mind the principle of a monarchy, and that they prefer the royal family to continue to exist. Even among young people. I wouldn't say it bothers me very much, I've learned to listen to the English who explain to me that for them it's also a guarantee of political stability (although the royal family has no official political role or power. ), but I was really surprised not to find more resistance to the monarchy. I tell myself, however, that the Scots, the Irish or the Welsh may be less attached to the royal family, but since I am less around them, I do not realize? The question is open, for those who wish to enrich the debate. 10. Thinking I knew what it meant to dress fancyBefore coming to the UK, I thought French women knew how to dress up for parties, weddings and other important events. This was before I went to my company Christmas parties, weddings or any other official party in the UK. Whether it's the false eyelashes, false nails, flamboyant (and sometimes extremely short) dresses, dizzying heels, hair stylings and tanned skins in the middle of December, or the awesome hats worn by these older ladies in the middle of December. 'a wedding (you can't be chic without a hat in England), English women take their party look very seriously. This involves, for the younger ones, hours of preparation (a colleague told me to prepare for 3 hours for the annual Christmas party at my company at the time), and for the older women, a head covering. . Not all English women are quite so flirtatious, but overall they make it big when it comes to dressing and going out. 11. Thinking that London is EnglandI plead guilty ! Now that I live outside of London, I realize the difference. London is the most populous city in Europe, which inevitably implies that it is more diverse, cultural, open or avant-garde than other large and medium-sized cities in the country. In London, we are used to rubbing shoulders with people from all over the world, the companies are full of employees from 5 continents, each with their different accent. This is less, if not much less, marked in smaller and less international cities (with the exception of course of certain other cities such as Oxford, Cambridge or Edinburgh, for example). There are also the London traits that we get used to when we live there, and which we do not miss when we leave London for a provincial town: cheaper rents, a less stressful life including less or no transport. in common, and sometimes even the possibility of walking almost everywhere, even to go to work. 12. Send very formal emailsWhen I started working in England, I wrote my emails “à la française”, that is, respecting the formal greeting protocol using “Bonjour Mme Dupont” and “Bonjour M. Durand”. With a few exceptions in very formal or official situations, everyone is called by their first name in emails, even if it is for example a customer that you have never met, or the first contact with your real estate agent. The end-of-letter or e-mail formulas are also less pompous: not “I beg you to agree blah blah blah…”, but rather “Kind regards” or one of its variations in one word. 13. Thinking that a pub is a pubTell me what your personality is, and I'll tell you what kind of pub you should go to. Please note, a pub is never just a pub in the UK, choose the type that suits you! Gastro pubs for example, are more and more common: they are often more refined, with a chef who offers a carefully studied menu, cooked from fresh and seasonal products, sometimes even organic, with a decor and an atmosphere. quite chic. This is the type of pub you take your parents to when they visit you. There are sports pubs, of the Wetherspoons type (one channel), which are very inexpensive, and bring together English football fans and cheap beer, with matches being broadcast in the background. There are also the neighborhood pubs, with a family atmosphere, which are a bit between the two types of pubs mentioned just before, and of course the traditional pub, very old and with massive wooden tables, huge. gilded mirrors above the bar and gilding all over the place, with reproductions of 18th or 19th century paintings, often of an admiral who has defeated French troops in a battle at one point or another. The choice of drinks is also an important criterion: some pubs are known for their wide choice of craft beers, others for also having a good wine or cocktail list. 14. Not knowing how to leave the pub at the right timeThis applies especially to evenings with colleagues, very common in the United Kingdom: there is always a moment, generally from 10 p.m. or 11 p.m., when the few (too) bon vivant in the group exceed the blood alcohol limit which shifts them to the dark side, resulting in a sudden change in the mood of the evening. Between those who just fall asleep with their heads on the table, those who get loud and a bit heavy, and those who try their luck with whatever moves, I usually like to leave right after the third round to avoid unpleasant situations. little annoying with colleagues who will have to greet in the kitchen on Monday morning!  

  • 0 How people recycle in London?

    • by admin
    • 12-11-2020
    0.00 of 0 votes

    Recycling: London wants to convert to bottle lockers. The decision, announced, will affect both glass and metal bottles as well as plastic ones. Would setting up a deposit system on all bottles, whatever their material, make a significant difference in waste recycling? In any case, this is what London hopes, which has announced a plan in this direction. "It is absolutely vital that we act now to tackle this threat and reduce the millions of plastic bottles that escape recycling every day," said British Environment Minister Michael Gove in a statement released on Wednesday. . Plastic, glass or metal bottles will be affected by this project. Consumers across the Channel will thus receive a small sum of change - indexed to the size of the container - against each bottle that they will return to automatic containers scattered around the cities and attached to stores. It is up to the latter to ensure the proper recycling of this waste, indicates the British government's project. Boost plastic recycling This measure should help boost the recycling of waste, particularly plastic, in the country. London draws on the experience of 38 countries which have already implemented this type of system over the past ten years. They have increased their recycling rate by over 90%. While the United Kingdom currently recycles 43% of the 13 billion plastic bottles used each year, Germany, which converted to the system in 2003, has a rate of 99%. In January, British Prime Minister Theresa May announced a new plan to fight plastic waste, providing for the generalization of paid plastic bags to all shops in England. Before being introduced, the deposit system will be subject to consultation this year with manufacturers and consumers to determine the terms. France lagging behindCurrently, the average recycling rate for plastic waste (not just bottles) is 31% in the European Union. With a rate of 22%, France is lagging behind on the subject. But the government's ambitions in this area are high. Edouard Philippe, the Prime Minister, announced his target for a rate of 100% by 2025, last July. Spectacular promises when we know that good European students, Germany or Norway, only reach 40% recycling.   Each year, around 374 billion chewing gum are consumed worldwide. Seven out of ten end up in the wild. A London designer collects these sticky little bits of rubber and recycles them. We let them fall apart into tiny particles, slowly but surely. It takes between 5 and 6 years for them to disappear from our sight. In other countries, this waste is cleaned up at great cost for energy, water and money. In Paris, we tried for a while to dislodge them, but the French capital threw in the towel. It was too expensive. Especially since this mini-waste comes back very quickly ... In London, the take-off of chewing gum costs millions of euros each year. It takes three months to clean up the 300,000 gums thrown away on Oxford Street alone. In the end, these little bits of rubber decompose and end up in the earth, in the sea ... Synthetic rubberOn the other hand, if they are just chewed, chewing gum interests Anna Bullus, a young designer: "I started to research what chewing gum is. It is largely made of synthetic gum. , a polymer comparable to certain plastics, the same one found in the inner tubes of bicycle wheels, explains Anna Bullus. So I had the idea of ​​creating pink mini-bins in this material which would allow to collect other chewed gums. And in the end, we recycle everything: my trash and what it contains. In this way, we recreate 3 trash cans with a full trash can. And the cycle begins again ". Today, these pink bins are found in 650 places in England, especially public places where there is a lot of traffic: near schools, shops, university campuses, train stations and even subways. In some places there are 100 trash cans. Each trash can costs £ 170 for service and maintenance for a year. The bill can therefore climb to 20,000 pounds, depending on the number of bins ordered. But even if it costs, recycling saves money. For Southampton Airport, for example, which has had 20 of these bins since 2012, the annual savings would already be in the order of 4,200 euros. Circular economyBut this young designer has also developed several derivative products: coffee cups, guitar picks, rulers, combs, rain boots, spoons, plates, small pocket bins… Her company Gumdrop Limited has succeeded to convince chewing gum manufacturers like Wrigley to pass on their scraps: "We are working with the surpluses of several chewing gum factories located all over the place: in America, Europe and the United Kingdom". Buy products made from chewing gum that have passed through the mouths of strangers? Consumers often react with a certain disgust… Anna reassures: "These chewing gums have been chewed but they are safe because they are burned at such a high temperature that the material is completely sterilized. It's like cutlery in a restaurant. dishwasher safe… Everyone reuses them ". Useful wasteAnna Bullus wants to change people's behavior, to make them aware of how they get rid of chewing gum after it has lost its taste. And it seems to be paying off. In addition, it decreases the significant cost to cities of taking off the latter. The city of Amsterdam has teamed up with its company GumDrop and another, ExplicitWater, to create shoes: Gumshoes. A sneaker with a bubble-gum pink sole that represents a map of the city, made from chewing gum collected on site. The price is high: 190 €. "Why this award? Because it's a limited edition, explains Anna Bullus. We only produced 500 pairs. But since it was so successful, I am in talks with other brands to create other shoes. this year. This is another way to educate their customers on the issue of chewing gum. " For Delphine Lévi Alvarès, coordinator at European level of the “Break Free From Plastic” movement which wants to eradicate plastic pollution in the world, this original recycling has, despite everything, its limits. "It is never a viable business model to produce something from something that should go," she explains. We tried to find out the composition of these products but Anna Bullus remains vague: "Manufacturing secret". The products she sells aren't actually just made from recycled chewing gum. "The proportion is at least 20% recycled chewing gum. Some contain more but never 100%", specifies Anna Bullus. "The rest is recycled plastic," she adds. We were unable to verify this information. The recycling of chewing gum remains a mystery but it is in any case profitable. Anna Bullus lives on it. Unfortunately, chewing gum bins are not always respected: many passers-by confuse these pink collection bins with ashtrays. There are cigarettes, metro tickets ... Mini-waste that has nothing to do with it. But Anna Bullus tells us that it doesn't stop her and that she recycles everything. After England and Copenhagen, where she has installed her pink trash cans, she would like to conquer the USA. With Uncle Sam, fond of chewing gum, the market is gigantic: 100,000 tons per year.  

  • 0 Soho and Trafalgar Square: London districts

    • by admin
    • 03-11-2020
    0.00 of 0 votes

    From the top of his haughty column, Admiral Nelson watches the ebb and flow of crowds in Trafalgar Square (London / England) as people hurry to their destinations, lounging by fountains or crowding the entrance to the National Gallery in the north side of the plaza. On the other side, the church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields provides a good setting for candlelight concerts. New Years Eve is usually celebrated here and is known as the most famous gathering place in the UK. It is home to some iconic monuments of the city such as Lord Nelson's. Leicester Square is the place where you can see the latest movies released or find a seat in the theater for half price.Squeezed between Leicester Square and the theaters on Shafterbury Avenue, Chinatown is packed with Asian restaurants, while European immigrants have given Soho a continental flavor, where the sound of jazz emerges from the clubs. It was originally called King's Square in honor of Charles II. His statue has been there since the foundation of the square in 1681. All destinations are very close to each other. »Trafalgar Square [Official website]: Admiral Horatio Nelson was killed in 1805, at the time of victory at the Battle of Trafalgas, in southwestern Spain, while fighting against Bonaparte's Spanish and French fleet. Its glory prevails in the square, a place of entertainment for all Londoners and of rallies and demonstrations, festivals and concerts. Nelson’s Column, designed by William Redton, was erected in 1843. Nelson’s granite statue was sculpted by EH Baily. Four lions, the work of Sir Edwin Landseer, watch over the column, and the friezes at the base illustrate the admiral's victories in cast bronze from captured cannons. The Fourth Plinth [Official website], in the northwest of the square, exhibits contemporary art. The Fourth Plinth Project is the association responsible for ensuring that every 18 months a different contemporary art sculpture occupies the space available on the Trafalgar Square pedestal. The bronze equestrian statue of King George IV, by Sir Francis Chantery from 1843, stands on a granite pedestal in the northeast corner of the square. »National Gallery (Trafalgar Square) [Official Website]: Founded in 1824, the National Gallery houses one of the most important collections in the world, tracing the history of Western European painting from the early 13th to the 20th centuries. The collection is arranged chronologically, beginning with the early Renaissance galleries in Sainsbury Wing (designed by postmodern architect Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown), continuing with the main building with the great masters of the 16th and 19th centuries, and ending with post-impressionists. Free entry to the permanent collection supports the gallery's founding principle: 'art for all'. The current National Gallery building was designed by William Wilkins between 1832 and 1838. Only the façade in Trafalgar Square remains essentially unchanged from its origin, as the building has been expanding through its facades throughout history. The permanent collection includes outstanding works by Jan Van Eyck ('The Arnolfini Marriage'), Botticelli ('Venus and Mars'), Leonardo da Vinci ('Madonna and Child'), Hans Holbein ('The Ambassadors'), Rembrandt, Gainsborough, Turner and Renoir. Among the Impressionists, Monet is well represented ('Bathers at La Grenouillère', 1869). The post-impressionist 'Bathers', by Cézanne, is in room 45. In the same room you can see three works by Vincent Van Gogh ('Sunflowers', 'Chair' and 'A wheat field with cypresses'). »National Portrait Gallery (St. Martin's Place) [Official Website]: Studies of famous people and heroes from British history, politics, sport and art are on display in the ever-expanding showcases of the National Portrait Gallery. The collection is made up of different elements, among which you can find photographs, paintings, caricatures, drawings and sculptures that are not necessarily exceptional works of art, but rather have great value when preserved as historical documents or as curiosities of great antiquity. The portraits are arranged chronologically starting from the upper floor, where you can find images from 1485, with members of the Tudor or Stuart family, as well as portraits of the most important figures of the Reformation. The highlight of the Tudor collection is the painting that Marcus Gheeraets made of Elizabeth I, dressed in great luxury. Here is the only portrait made of William Shakespeare. The ground floor exhibits an eclectic selection of 21st century characters. »St. Martin-in-the-Fields (Trafalgar Square) [Official website]: If this royal church of Anglican worship looks familiar, it is because it has been copied in New England (USA) and in India, St Andrew's Church , in the Egmore neighborhood of Chennai (Madras). The current Georgian building was built in 1721, in the neoclassical style, by the architect James Gibbs, also the author of the Radcliffe Camera in Oxford. The royal coat of arms in the colonnade of the entrance indicates that it is the parish church of Buckingham Palace; you can see the royal box entering to the left. Famous for its music, the church regularly hosts concerts. In this church Sir Neville Marriner gave his first Baroque music concerts in 1956 with his Academy of St Martin in the Fields. Café in the Crypt beats to the beat of jazz on Wednesday nights. »Leicester Square [Official website]: The red carpet is laid out here for movie premieres. The square has long been a nerve center for fun. The Empire, on the north side, was once a Victorian auditorium that now houses several cinemas and MTV UK studios. The Odeon Theater is said to have the largest screen in the world. Except for movie stars' limousines, this is a pedestrianized area, and on the sidewalks you can see the handprints of Clint Eastwood, Helena Bonham Carter and others. Statues of Shakespeare (19th century) and Chaplin adorn the gardens. The square gets its name after the purchase of 1.6 hectares by Robert Sideney, in St. Martin's Field in 1630; in 1635 he had a large house built for himself, Leicester House, in the northern part of London. The area in front of the large house was then fenced off, thus preventing the residents of St. Martins Parish from their right of way. These caught the attention of King Charles I, who ordered Lord Leicester to keep part of his land open to the »Piccadilly Circus: West of Leicester Square, the figure of Eros, erected in Piccadilly in 1893, marks the heart of the West End theater area. Around this timeless statue, the rooms follow one another. The premises of the former London Pavilion concert hall and its neighbor, the once Palace of Varieties, have been transformed into the Trocadero shopping and entertainment center. Other venues are immovable: the Criterion Theater (2 Jermyn Street) remains underground, and the fabulously decorated Criterion Bar and Restaurant (224 Piccadilly) is a feast for the eyes. The Coca-Cola neon sign in Piccadilly has been shining in the Circus since 1955.»Shaftesbury Avenue: The philanthropist Lord Shaftesbury demolished the suburb during the 1880s to create Shaftesbury Avenue, which runs northeast from Piccadilly. Many West End theaters are here. All exude Edwardian grandeur, with impressive hallways. The Lyric Theater (number 29) [Official website] is the oldest, from 1888; the Apollo Theater (number 31) has the highest upper gallery in London. The two giants, which have a capacity of about 1,400 and date back to 1911, are the Palace Theater (number 109) and the Shaftesbury Theater (number 210). Built as the home of the Royal English Opera House, the Palace is popular for musicals ('Les Misérables' was performed for 18 years), while the Shaftesbury bustled with the 1960s hit 'Hair'. »Chinatown London [Official Website]: On Sundays, St. Martin-in-the-Fiels offers services in Cantonese and Mandarin for the Chinese population. The red and gold doors announce a pedestrian zone around Gerrard Street, on the south side of Shaftesbury Avenue, where more than 70 restaurants serve Cantonese, 'Szechuan', Japanese, Thai and Malaysian food, among others. Jen Café (4-8 Newport Place) stands out, where you can watch the dumplings (stuffed dumplings, sweet or savory) being rolled from the window. Always vibrant, Chinatown explodes during the Chinese New Year. Chinatown is not devoid of history. The original area was in the eastern part of London, where thousands of Chinese sailors began to gather at the end of the 18th century. These had been hired in China but, for various reasons, they had had to stay and live in London. By 1914, 30 Chinese businesses had been opened in Limehouse, most to supply the sailors themselves. During World War II, the area was destroyed and finding work in the navy was an impossible mission for foreigners. »Soho Square: Everyone is drawn to the Soho Square garden, where free concerts and festivals are held in summer. The statue of Charles II recalls that the square was called King's Square, and it was one of the most 'in' postal addresses. The statue of Charles II was carved by Danish sculptor Caius Gabriel Cibber during Charles's reign in 1681. The square is home to St. Patrick's Church, a large Catholic parish partially situated on the Carlisle House plot with extensive catacombs stretching across below the plaza and outside of it. At numbers 8 and 9 is the French Protestant Church in London, built between 1891 and 1893. Today, Soho Square is at the heart of the UK film industry.

  • 0 British Customs and Traditions

    • by admin
    • 01-11-2020
    0.00 of 0 votes

    Read carefully if you don't know what to expect on your visit to London /not true 100%/ Here are the ten most relevant English customs to understand a little more this influential little country! 1. THE WEATHERThe British like to discuss the weather. MANY. In fact, it's a great way to start a conversation with anyone. So come up with some useful sentences to describe the perfect / rainy / peaceful / painful / thumbs up (word choice is yours). 2. QueueYes that's right, Brits love a good order, and they take their waits really seriously. Whether you are in a store, at the post office, or at the bus stop, you will find that in general the Brits line up in a single disciplined line to allow the first to arrive to be served first. If you don't want to face the disapproving stares of London's queue lovers, you better take your place behind and wait your turn. 3. PARDONSArriving in the UK it will seem like people ask for forgiveness almost constantly. According to a recent poll, the average Brit will say "sorry" about eight times a day — and many will say it up to twenty times! When seeking help from a foreigner, well-behaved Brits will likely start with "sorry to bother you" or "sorry to bother you." The British are well known for their apologies in almost any situation. Push someone in the UK and they'll probably say, “So sorry! "Even though it's not his fault. 4. BARBECUESAs you will understand, the weather in the UK is variable to say the least. You never know if the sun is going to last, so when it comes out the Brits have a habit of rushing to buy meat, bread, and alcohol to have spontaneous barbecues in their gardens or in the park. You'll also find them sipping Pimms and hitting the beaches to put your toe in the sea! 5. TEAThe love affair between the British and tea is well documented. In fact, they drink around 60 billion cups a year! 'Tea breaks' are common during the day in the UK and if a fit does strike it is not uncommon to set the kettle on. Brits are often special when it comes to brewing tea, so if ever you find that it's up to you to do it, pay attention to the details! 6. EUPHEMISMSThe British are notorious not to say how they feel. Why ? They are all too polite to say what they want, for fear of offending anyone. If someone says "with all due respect", the person is likely to disagree with you at all. Minimization is also important for British culture. Instead of saying "This is great! "They will say" It's not bad "or" not too shabby! " A potentially life-threatening situation could even be described as a "sticky situation". 7. PERSONAL SPACEIn general, people in the UK are a very reserved people, and they value their personal space. If you see empty seats when you get on the bus, it is customary for you to take them instead of sitting right next to someone. There is nothing personal, and most Brits are very friendly if you take the time to get to know them. 8. IDIOMATIC EXPRESSIONSThe British love their idioms. Perhaps it is still their aversion to saying what they feel! If something is expensive, it costs "an arm and a leg!" "(" One arm and one leg "). If something happens right away, it happens “at the drop of a hat”. If you've taken on more than you can handle, you've “bitten off more than you can chew”. It's not always clear what these beloved phrases mean, so take note if you hear any to remember them soon! 9. THE "FULL ENGLISH"If the thought of eating the egg, bacon, and sausage with white beans in sauce, mushrooms, tomatoes, and fried bread turns your stomach upside down, don't order Full English without it. the knowledge. It's a traditional UK breakfast, or "brekky," and it's served at many taverns across the country. If you don't feel like trying it in the morning, several restaurants serve it all day long (probably because those who have just had a drunken night don't get up until after 2:00 p.m.!) 10. NO COMPLAINTIf you're at the restaurant and your meal isn't quite perfect, or the service is poor, the manager needs to know, right? False! For the British, there is no question of putting on a scene - even being polite - in front of other guests. In this situation, a true Briton will keep "schtum," choosing instead to finish eating the mediocre meal in silence.

  • 0 Things to do in London

    • by admin
    • 28-10-2020
    0.00 of 0 votes

      See the best of London with our guide to the capital's must-see attractions and activities.Enjoy a multitude of things to do and see during your stay. Whether you are visiting the capital for the first time or are a regular, there is always more to see in London.   From tourist attractions to hidden corners, and from traditional restaurants to inexpensive activities, find the best things to do in London as a family, couple, solo or with friends with our tips below. The best of attractions Ready, set, go ! Check the top 10 attractions on your list. Come see 55 of London's most important landmarks with a ride on the London Eye.Soar above London on the Emirates Air Line gondola.Discover the magnificent Hampton Court Palace, former home of Henry VIII.Be dazzled by the largest diamond in the world, on display in the Tower of London's Jewel Room.Visit Buckingham Palace during its summer opening.Climb to the top of the dome of St Paul's Cathedral and enjoy spectacular views of London.See Egyptian mummies and the famous Rosetta Stone at the British Museum. Tourist london Get an overview of London's sights as you board a hop-on hop-off bus.Explore historic Greenwich and follow the famous meridian line.Embark on a boat ride on the Thames and see London from a different perspective.Get a closer look at the most interesting tourist attractions with a guided walking tour.Watch the iconic Changing of the Guard ceremony opposite Buckingham Palace.Meet the Beefeaters at the Tower of London and let them share the Tower's oldest secrets with you.Take a photo of Piccadilly Circus in front of its famous illuminated billboards.Come see the bronze lions and Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square. Discover the eight Royal Parks of London, from pretty St James’s Park to peaceful Bushy Park.Stroll along the Thames on the South Bank and admire some of London's most famous landmarks, from the Houses of Parliament to Tower Bridge. Or venture out of the city center to Kew or Hampton Court Palace in West London.Come and admire the works of art on display at the National Gallery, Tate Modern and other major galleries in the capital for free.Be around Big Ben when the bell strikes the hour.Have fun at the free annual More London Festival, which takes place near London Bridge, or watch the street performers in Covent Garden.Admire the 12,000 roses at Queen Mary’s Gardens in Regent’s Park. Visit them during the first half of June when the flowers are in full bloom.Come watch the Wimbledon matches outdoors at the Scoop.Be in the right place at the right time to see the Tower Bridge deck rise. Having fun in London Explore the city by bike with Santander Cycles, London's self-service bicycle network. Drive through Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park to relive the spirit of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.Take a roller coaster ride at one of London's theme parks, like Thorpe Park or Chessington World of Adventures.Meet all your favorite characters from the legendary Star Wars saga at Madame Tussauds.In winter, ice skate in front of iconic landmarks adorned with lights, such as Hampton Court Palace and Somerset House.From April to October, rent a pedal boat or rowboat at Hyde Park's famous Serpentine Lake.Have fun all night long with your friends at one of London's best bowling alleys.Catch a match at the legendary Wembley Stadium, or soak up the atmosphere of London football clubs at Chelsea or Arsenal.Take a speedboat ride down the Thames - you'll feel like James Bond! London for kids Push a cart into the Wizarding World of Harry Potter on Pier 9 ¾ at King's Cross.See life-size dinosaurs at Crystal Palace Park and explore the maze and children's farm.Come say hello to the penguins at ZSL London Zoo.Enter the Gryffindor Common Room and see hundreds of costumes and props from the Harry Potter films, during a tour of the Warner Bros. Studio Tour London - The Making of Harry Potter.Discover London's underground tunnels on a Mail Rail train ride from the Postal Museum.Come say hello to our underwater friends at the SEA LIFE London Aquarium.Take the kids to the theater and catch shows for the whole family, including The Lion King and Mary Poppins.Fly a kite over Hampstead Heath, take a dip in one of its swimming ponds, and enjoy the views from Parliament Hill.Explore the V&A Museum of Childhood's toy collection.Come see the Apollo 10 command capsule at the Science Museum. Unusual London Take a stroll through the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew and come see Amorphophallus titanum, a giant (and fragrant) plant with an incredibly rare bloom.Climb to The O2: Climb to the top of this world-famous entertainment venue and enjoy 360-degree views of London's cityscape.Go off the beaten track and discover London's hidden gems, from Eltham Palace to Apsley House.Explore rare plants in the enchanting Epping Forest.Discover the strange and wonderful world of medicine at the Wellcome Collection and Body Worlds at the London Pavilion.Enter the ruins of London's Roman Amphitheater at the Guildhall Art Gallery & Roman Ampitheater. Romantic london Take in the spectacular views as the sun sets over London with The View from the Shard.Take a romantic stroll through Holland Park and its pretty Kyoto Garden.Sip a cocktail and admire the view of London at night from a rooftop.See London from above on a helicopter tour.Take in the views from Primrose Hill and stroll through this charming neighborhood.Immerse yourself with your loved one in the magical atmosphere of London as Christmas lights illuminate the capital's most famous shopping streets.Treat your loved one to a special dinner cooked up at one of London's best romantic restaurants, like the Aqua Shard.Propose in one of London's most romantic places like the London Eye, on a river cruise or near the beautiful canals of Little Venice. London at low prices Go on a guided tour and then attend a play at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater. Standing tickets can be purchased for just £ 5.Discover the capital in one of London's iconic red buses and enjoy the view from the top floor. A one-way bus ticket costs just £ 1.50.Have a bite to eat at London's coolest food trucks, or sample a bagel or pie bought from one of the street food stalls in the capital's many markets.Catch a show at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden and buy standing tickets from just £ 5.Take a guided tour of the fascinating Highgate Cemetery for just £ 4 and come see the impressive tomb of Karl Marx. What to do in London at night? Catch a musical in London's West End.Check out the nightly hours of operation for the Barbican, the National Gallery, the Royal Academy of Arts and many other museums and galleries for special events, DJ nights and more.Drink a glass at a London champagne bar.Dance the night away at one of London's clubs.Climb to the top of the Sky Garden for free and enjoy spectacular views of all of London at night. Entrance to the Sky Garden is limited - book online in advance.Treat yourself to a cocktail prepared by an expert in one of the capital's luxurious cocktail bars.Go on a guided candlelight tour of the Sir John Soane’s Museum (every first Tuesday of the month) and admire the eclectic residence of this eminent 19th century architect.Discover the most atypical bars in London, like Trader Vic's or The Mayor of Scaredy Cat Town. What to do in London on Sunday? Enjoy a traditional Sunday roast in a London pub, and don't miss the Yorkshire pudding!Stroll among the flowers at Columbia Road Flower Market.Taste street food from around the world at Brick Lane Market and Greenwich Market.Discover Covent Garden Market, Old Spitalfields Market as well as the lesser-known Sunday markets that take place across the city.Grab your blanket and something to eat and come have a picnic in Hyde Park.Cheer on your favorite team by watching a game in a bar or sports pub.Take part in a debate in Speaker's Corner.Use the capital as a starting point for touring the UK and book an excursion from London. The best events in London Take part in the biggest Chinese New Year celebrations outside of Asia, in Chinatown, Trafalgar Square and the West End.Celebrate Ireland on Saint Patrick's Day in March, with marching bands, parades, street theater and more throughout the capital.Celebrate Bonfire Night with fireworks in London every November.Watch the Trooping the Color military parade which takes place in June to celebrate the Queen's birthday.Come enjoy the colors and sounds straight from the Caribbean with the Notting Hill Carnival, which takes place in August.Cheer on the greats of tennis at the famous Wimbledon tournament.Enjoy the best of London at Christmas: soak up the magical atmosphere, admire the stunning decorations, and visit Santa's Workshop.Find the perfect spot on the banks of the Thames to admire the spectacular New Year's Eve fireworks display.Let yourself be whisked away to one of London's legendary music festivals and dance to the tunes of your favorite bands.Celebrate London's diversity with the Pride in London festival. Eating in London You can't leave London without trying afternoon tea, a British custom par excellence. Whether you choose the classic or the unusual, you won't be disappointed.Treat yourself to an unforgettable meal at one of London's Michelin-starred restaurants, with one of the world's most renowned chefs.Come and eat at one of London's most unusual restaurants - have you ever tried eating in the dark or while attending a circus performance?Sample an authentic curry at one of the many restaurants and stalls on Brick Lane.Feast on crispy fish and chips - another British classic.Enjoy a meal with a good pint in a traditional London pub. Or for beer lovers, find out how it's brewed on a London Craft Beer Tour.Sample dim sum and regional Chinese cuisine at restaurants in Chinatown.Try the English specialty "pie and mash" at one of the capital's "pie shops" and restaurants, such as Rules and Pieminister. Shopping in London From antiques to designer clothes, you'll find them in London's top 10 markets. You can also just walk around and take pictures.Shop for high-end products at a luxury department store in London, from Harrods, Liberty and Selfridges to John Lewis and Debenhams.Find everything you need in one place at Westfield Stratford City, Europe's largest urban shopping center.Stroll while sipping hot chocolate along London's Christmas markets.Shop for gourmet delights, quality produce and sweet treats at one of London's top food markets.Enjoy the best retro clothing boutiques with a stroll through the capital's vintage stores.  

  • 0 Accommodation in London

    • by admin
    • 27-10-2020
    0.00 of 0 votes

    How to find accommodation in London? We all know that property prices are very high in the London capital. For this, know that, whether for an internship, a job, for studies or simply to settle there in the long term, you have all the solutions on how to find accommodation in the various articles that we offer. made for you. Indeed, if you have a small budget, you will find articles on, shared accommodation in London: Zone 2, shared accommodation in London: Zone 3 or even how to find youth hostels and many other writings that will help you to make your choice. On the other hand, if you have no constraints on the budget for your future home and you come to settle with your family or as a couple, finding accommodation in London would be the perfect solution! It is true that finding accommodation in London is not an easy thing. On the one hand the rents are quite expensive and on the other hand, the rental agencies are not necessarily the best suited to meet your demand. TAKE ADVANCE TO FIND ACCOMMODATION IN LONDON It is best to start your research two to three months in advance to find accommodation in London. Movaway mainly offers shared rooms, but you can make a specific request for larger accommodation for yourself. Our team will find you the accommodation of your dreams. Also, Movaway has a Facebook group, in which people living in London often post housing ads. This is it, check it out and find plenty of great tips! Either way, if you still can't find it. There are secure sites specializing in rental accommodation in London. Because of this, you can find the rare pearl and cocoon that suits you on classified ad sites such as Zoopla! If a property catches your eye, do not hesitate to contact the owner as soon as possible. Indeed, the advertisements on the sites are often obsolete, because the beautiful apartments are rented very quickly. Therefore, you need to be responsive! Then, as we explain here, by contacting Movaway, you have the possibility to book accommodation in London online. Do not wait and come to us, we will be happy to help you with your research. ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIFICATIONS TO FIND AN APARTMENT IN LONDONDOCUMENTS TO BE PROVIDEDOnce you have found accommodation in London, a number of documents will be requested from your agency or the owner of the property. The documents requested may vary from person to person, but references must be provided in order to be able to present a solid case. Here is a list of the documents to provide to find accommodation in London: A copy of your passport or identity cardLetter from your employer confirming your salaryLetter from your former landlord recommending and confirming your diligence in paying rent (this applies to people who already live in England and not to people who are arriving)WHAT ABOUT THE BUDGET FOR AN APARTMENT IN LONDON?It depends on the landlord's requirements but if you have a job your salary should cover at least 2.5 to 3 times your rent. This gives you an advantage and your file will be more easily chosen! It is necessary in particular to envisage a month's rent and a deposit of 4 to 8 weeks. In addition, as you have seen, in the documents to provide, it is important to have a job in order to be able to claim accommodation in London. However, if you have just arrived in the capital or for any other reason and you don't have a job, you have the option of paying 6 months' rent in advance. You will not be asked for proof of employment. LEASES OF APARTMENTS IN LONDON expatriates are often surprised by the specificities of English leases. Indeed, in England, a lease is particularly more in favor of the owners than of the tenants. To do this, we help you to understand the peculiarities of these. You will therefore have the weapons to properly negotiate the rental of accommodation in London. The most common lease is the one-year lease with the possibility of ending it after 6 months. This is the "6 months Break Clause". It is also possible to obtain a lease of up to 2 years. Indeed, apartment owners in London struggle with long-term rentals. You are probably wondering why? Well, a lot of times this is a technique (or an excuse) to be able to raise the rent. If you wish to leave the apartment, you must respect a notice period of 2 months. Or 4 months rental if you hope to leave in the 6th month. This is the "non-break clause". Therefore, it is best to negotiate non-break clauses and lease renewals in advance to protect yourself. Good to know: It is very rare for landlords to accept a 6 month break clause when the lease begins in summer. This is explained by the fear of the latter to put the good back on the market during the winter. A regulation that favors the owners?Rent increases are made every year for housing in London. This increase is calculated based on the cost of living index. You understand, the regulation of housing leases in London, greatly favors landlords, the English lease includes many clauses that may seem abusive for a person who has always lived elsewhere. Among these clauses, there are: the ban on smoking, the ban on drilling into walls to hang paintings, the ban on having an animal without the owner's permission, the ban on wearing heels within the apartment etc… Obviously, these prohibitions vary according to the type of owner you have in front of you and you can negotiate them. But be careful in the way you do it. Indeed, although for you, certain clauses seem a little “too much” to you, they are quite normal for donors. So, if you request the cancellation of too many causes, they can retract on the signing of the lease. Finally, where furnished apartments are more expensive than unfurnished ones, London is not. Taking one or the other has no influence on the price. But Movaway still advises you to take a furnished apartment. It will make your life easier and you won't have to spend your money on furniture when you arrive. Good to know: The entry and exit inventory is carried out by an independent body. It is they who are responsible for making a detailed report during a move of any damage caused to the apartment. THE CHOICE OF THE ZONE TO RENT A HOUSING IN LONDONUnlike some capitals around the world, London is huge. The distances between your workplace and your place of residence can therefore be potentially long. To help you visualize, you should know that London is 10 times the size of Paris. The city is therefore divided into 9 zones. You might as well say that you will get lost more than once at the beginning. So, if you rent an apartment in Zones 1, 2 and 3, the rent will be more expensive than the other zones. Indeed, the closer we get to zone 1, the closer we get to the hyper center. In the rest of this article, we will therefore give you the price brackets by zone and more particularly by district. FIND ACCOMMODATION IN LONDON: SOUTH LONDONFULHAMIf you want to rent accommodation in London, well Fulham must be one of your choices. This is a very nice area of ​​Zone 2 with plenty of restaurants, pubs, schools not to be missed. The architecture of the area offers red brick houses and buildings dating from the 80s to 90s. This area is very well served with plenty of bus lines, but also 3 tube stations which are: Fulham Brodway, Putney Bridge and Parsons Green. If you want to know more, we tell you more about this beautiful neighborhood in this article. The area is very pleasant and very well located since it is close to the hyper-center. Housing in Fulham in a few figuresOne bedroom apartment, average price from: £ 1,400A 2 bedroom apartment, average price starts at: £ 1,790Apartment with 3 bedrooms, average price from: £ 2,606A house with 2 bedrooms, average price starts at: £ 1,8003 bedroom house, average price from: £ 2,500House with 4 bedrooms, average price starts at: £ 3,600 ANGELAngel is a neighborhood to consider if you are looking for accommodation in London. The district is located in Zone 2 which is popular with Londoners as it is relatively close to the inner city. In addition, Angel is very well served by public transport. The neighborhood is calm. It is important to note that the prices of housing in London, especially in Angel have increased in recent years. In fact, the area being very popular, more and more foreigners are looking to have an apartment in this area. This is very beneficial for the price of rents which are set at high prices. Housing in Angel in a few figuresAn average studio from: £ 1,200One bedroom apartment, average price starts at: £ 1,400A 2 bedroom apartment, average price starts at: £ 1,8003 bedroom apartment, avg price from: £ 2,100A 2 bedroom house, average price from: £ 2,000LONDON BRIDGEThere you have a neighborhood that educates you historically speaking! This district has many historic sites and impressive monuments. The urban landscape that this little corner offers you is one of the most beautiful in the city. Indeed, this district is a real treat for the eyes with its cobbled streets, its winding alleys and its banks. In addition you will have the possibility of living near the tower: The Shard; the tallest skyscraper in Europe. The area is also very famous for its restaurants and pubs, which is a delight for the youngest and for the students who settle there. Housing in London Bridge in figuresStudio: on average from £ 10001 bedroom apartment: on average from £ 1300For a 2 bedroom apartment: on average from £ 1600A 3 bedroom apartment: on average from £ 1900FIND ACCOMMODATION IN LONDON: EAST LONDONCANARY WHARFLiving in Canary Wharf brings a lot of benefits. The Cary Wharf district is one of the coolest and most modern areas in London. You have a business district here, in fact the skyscrapers are home to many businesses. So if you are hoping to have a job near your home, this is the place for you. You will have the opportunity to enjoy a multitude of activities in this neighborhood. If you have friends or family who want to come visit you, they can take advantage of the many hotels and Airbnbs available to them. There is something for all prices and all sizes. Housing in Canary Wharf in figuresStudio: on average from £ 11001 bedroom apartment: on average from £ 1300For a 2 bedroom apartment: on average from £ 1600A 3 bedroom apartment: on average from £ 2,500 SHOREDITCHThe heart of London now beats in Shoreditch. This is arguably one of the best places to rent accommodation in London. And in recent years it is even the artists who have left the west of the city to come and settle here, in the east, and when art gets involved the rest of the world does not take long to follow. The strength of this district lies in its ability to cross the ages. We explain: Shoreditch has become trendy, inspiring young people and promising a bright future for the English capital. Obviously all of this, while keeping its popular and cosmopolitan side which makes it so unique. Indeed, it is thanks to its atypical, trendy and modern accommodation that Shoreditch has become the place of choice for young people wanting to find an apartment in London. But if you want to find out more about this neighborhood, we tell you more about it in this article. Housing in Shoreditch in figuresStudio: on average from £ 11001 bedroom apartment: on average from £ 1300For a 2 bedroom apartment: on average from £ 1600A 3 bedroom apartment: on average from £ 1900Good to know: In view of the expansion of the population, around 526,000 new housing units must be built by 2021. In other words, the choice of apartment will be there. FIND ACCOMMODATION IN LONDON: CENTRAL LONDONCOVENT GARDENCovent Garden is one of London's iconic neighborhoods. It sits between St Martin’s Lane and Drury Lane in Zone 1. You cannot get more central. Covent Garden? This is the place to be if you are looking to move into accommodation in London. This place combines business and leisure to perfection. In this neighborhood, you can have a job and be close to all tourist activities. In addition, thanks to its dynamism, this district has charmed many tourists from all over the world. Indeed, Covent Garden is one of the most popular and especially tourist places in the British capital. This is where Trafalgar Square and Leicester Square are located. Perhaps that is why the prices in this area are high. Covent Garden is very well served by public transport including the metro with the following lines: Central line, Northern line, Picadilly line, Circle and District lines. It is true that it is preferable to move this way in this district where the traffic is very dense. It is even better to get around on foot! This will allow you to discover all the charm of this magnificent city. Housing in Covent Garden in a few figuresA studio: on average from £ 1,400One bedroom apartment: On average from £ 1,8002 bedroom apartment: On average from £ 2,600A 3 bedroom apartment: On average from £ 4,800 FIND ACCOMMODATION IN LONDON: WEST LONDONNOTTING HILLIf there is one area in London that is known to everyone, it's Notting Hill! This is a place where everyone wants to live. So if you are applying for an apartment here, make sure you have a good budget! The Notting Hill area was made famous by the cult films 'Love at first sight in Notting Hill' and 'Love actually'. Today, this place has established itself as one of the most beautiful and pleasant areas in London. It is the most visited district of the city not only thanks to the popularity of its houses with colorful facades, but also thanks to its carnival which takes place every year and which attracts more than 2 million people. The neighborhood is very clean, quiet, and you really feel like you are walking around the setting of a romantic movie. In addition, you find Portobello Road which is without a doubt the most famous street in the neighborhood. This is where the Portobello Road Market is held; London's most famous antique market. It will be difficult not to be charmed by this pretty little corner. London has many beautiful neighborhoods and Notting Hill is the perfect example. It is a very lively place filled with bars, pubs and restaurants mixing different culinary styles The area is well served and is connected to the metro by the following lines: central line, the hammersmiths, and cityline. As you can imagine, the accommodation in this very chic and popular area is quite expensive. Housing in Notting Hill in figuresFor an average studio from: £ 1,3001 bedroom apartment, on average from £ 1,7002 bedroom apartment, on average from £ 2,300For renting an apartment with 3 bedrooms, on average from £ 2,900House with 2 bedrooms, on average from £ 3,400KING’S CROSSKing’s cross is a central district located in zone 1 of London. This is a rapidly changing neighborhood. This area has literally changed and goes against the idea that people have around train stations. Generally people think that the neighborhoods around train stations are dangerous and uninteresting. Now King’s Cross is a very trendy borough! It is a district that offers a multitude of cultural and artistic activities. Likewise, many pubs, cafes and new, super cool and trendy spots are settling there little by little ... Shops, galleries and restaurants are also coming to them. As well as real estate programs, often very luxurious, are developing there. Large companies such as Google, Louis Vuitton, The Guardian decide to settle in the district of King’s Cross. The are numerous in this district since it allows them to get to Paris if they wish in two hours. Indeed, this is where the Eurostar stands. So if you want to find beautiful accommodation in London. King’s Cross offers you this opportunity. Housing in King's Cross in a few figuresFor a studio: £ 1,200A 1 bedroom apartment, on average from £ 1,500Apartment with 2 bedrooms, on average from £ 2,000Rent an apartment with 3 bedrooms, on average from: £ 2,500Rent a house with 2 bedrooms, on average from £ 2,100A house with 3 bedrooms, on average from £ 3,100House with 4 bedrooms, on average from £ 4,200 HOLBORNHolborn (otherwise known as “city”) is a legal district located on the western edge of the City of London. Considered a place that mixes old and new, this district is the emblem of lawyers, the press and journalists. It is here that the entire history of the press is recorded, particularly through the various historical monuments. In addition, you will find luxury shops there as well as many restaurants of all kinds, where you can discover different types of gastronomy. Housing in Holborn in figuresAverage studio from: £ 1,200For an average 1-bedroom apartment from: £ 1,430Average 2 bedroom apartment from: £ 2,090Average 3 bedroom apartment from: £ 2,720An average 2 bedroom house starts at: £ 2,160Average 3 bedroom house starts at: £ 3,150Average 4 bedroom house from: £ 3,893Here ! You have all the tips and information to find accommodation in London and avoid all the traps some people often fall into. You probably have to tell yourself that moving to London sounds complicated. But rest assured, once all the formalities have been completed, all you have to do is enjoy this multicultural city, in which no neighborhood is alike, but all have something to offer. Movaway wish you good luck in your research! And don't hesitate to contact us so that you can find your dream apartment or house in London.   Housing in London /old article/ As a newcomer, it can be quite difficult to find accommodation in the UK capital, but there are ways to simplify your search. London covers an area of ​​1,572km² and has thirty boroughs, which means that thousands of homes are available for rent and purchase. It is good to start your research with a clear idea of ​​the neighborhood in which you would like to live. Whether you're looking for green spaces, vibrant nightlife, or just great value for money, figure out which neighborhoods have the most to offer. Take into account the obligations you will have elsewhere (for example, going to work) to further refine your target neighborhoods. Shared accommodation is very common in London, as it allows people to live closer to the center and in more spacious surroundings for less rent. Individual accommodation is rather expensive. You will find more studios and small apartments towards the center, where space is scarce, and more houses on the outskirts. The outskirts of London are more affordable and spacious, but commuting to and from the center can be quite complicated. The culture is also different. Consult the London Transport website and the Underground Map to estimate your travel prospects from certain areas. The main districts of LondonThe main part of the city is divided into several districts including Central London (central London), North London (north London), South London (south London), East London (east London) and West London (west London). Each district has its own identity and culture. Central LondonGenerally more commercial than residential, accommodation in Central London is less frequent and more expensive. It is understandable to have to pay extra for accommodation in close proximity to Oxford Street, Trafalgar Square and the Sherlock Holmes House on Baker Street. Bloomsbury, Fitzrovia, Marylebone and Mayfair offer wonderful living environments. Typical portrait of the inhabitants: workers in their forties, affluent couples, families North LondonConnected to the city center by the north line of the London Underground, the quiet areas of North London are just 15 minutes from the heart of the urban hustle and bustle. North London is a great neighborhood for employees needing to commute to work and for those with family. Among its green and pleasant neighborhoods are Highgate, Hampstead, Tufnell Park and Finsbury Park. Typical portrait of residents: all ages, employees, couples and families South LondonConsistently rated as London's best living area, Clapham offers a great atmosphere, plenty of activities and is relatively affordable. The area is home to Clapham Common, a large city park, and has excellent access to transport networks (including Europe's busiest train station, Clapham Junction), offering the best of both worlds. Other areas to consider are Brixton, Balham and Tooting Bec. Typical portrait of residents: all ages, employees, couples and families East LondonEast London is arguably the most vibrant, creative and diverse district in London. It is filled with galleries, markets, not to mention trendy boutiques and cafes, offering a wide variety of activities. Shoreditch, Dalston and Haggerston are sometimes criticized for becoming too hipster and too expensive, but they continue to represent sought-after places to live and socialize. Typical portrait of residents: young workers in their twenties and thirties, students, creative profiles West LondonAlthough remaining very mixed, West London has acquired a reputation as a neighborhood home to wealthy workers and families. Neighborhoods such as Holland Park, Notting Hill and Ladbroke Grove are particularly beautiful and expensive examples of the gentrification process currently underway in the capital. Shepherd's Bush and Hammersmith, although in close proximity to the areas listed above, are much more affordable and remain well connected to the city center and surrounding areas. Towards the outskirts of London, places like Wimbledon, Barnes and Richmond offer greener and more spacious homes. Typical portrait of the inhabitants: workers in their thirties, couples, and families Types of accommodation in LondonDifferent types of accommodation are available in London: studios, apartments, houses, hostels and hotels. Rents vary according to the number of rooms, the neighborhood and access to transport. The cheapest accommodations are studios and shared apartments, usually some distance from the center. The average price for a room varies between £ 600 and £ 1,200. Average rent for a two-room apartment starts at £ 1,200, and £ 2,200 for a three-room apartment. The further you move from the city center, the lower the rents. The price of a studio in the center is generally the same as that of a three-room apartment in the outskirts. Outside London, where the journey to the center may be as short as 20 minutes on a national train, you can rent an entire house for the same price. Find accommodation in LondonApartments and houses are available and quickly occupied in London. Ads posted on sites such as Gumtree find takers and disappear from sites within a day or even an hour. It is important to keep a close eye on the real estate market and be quick. First, make sure you have all the documents you need when signing the lease. You could also set up e-mail alerts for properties that match your criteria and that may be of interest to you. It is also advisable to conduct your research at least once a day, with real estate agencies or on the Internet. As soon as you have located the accommodation that suits you, call the owner or the real estate agency as soon as possible to make an appointment. If you are satisfied with the accommodation during the site visit and want to rent the accommodation, confirm quickly. The real estate market in LondonMost Londoners prefer renting because the city is one of the most expensive in Europe when it comes to buying real estate. The London property market continues to grow rapidly, with prices skyrocketing. If you are keen on buying accommodation in London, Greater London can often be more affordable and guarantee you more space. Here you will find, for example, houses with gardens. Buying property prices in Central London average £ 1,459,408, £ 600,000 in Greater London and £ 400,000 in areas like Waltham Forest. Mortgage loans are also granted to foreign nationals. Buying property in London can be a profitable investment in the long run, saving you considerable rent. Many owners rent out their property in order to boost their return on their investment. It is important to find a serious seller or a reliable real estate agency. You can find real estate agencies online or just on the busy streets. Buying accommodation in LondonThe procedures for purchasing real estate can take at least eight weeks. Your legal representative will take care of the exchange of contracts on your behalf. Among other things, he will have to check the validity of the title deed, carry out research on the housing environment with the local authorities and review the sales contract before you sign it. In addition, you are required to pay a security deposit of around 10% of the sale price to the seller when you formally agree to purchase the property. Please note: If you decide to back out after paying the deposit, the seller will not refund the deposit. He could even claim damages from you for breach of contract.

  • 0 Everything you need to know about the London Underground

    • by admin
    • 26-10-2020
    0.00 of 0 votes

    The oldest underground in the world is located in London and it is full of surprising anecdotes. Erected in the 19th century, discover the history of the undergrounds of the capital of the United Kingdom.The cockade, a planetary symbolWho does not know the famous red circle crossed out by a blue rectangle? Appeared in 1908, to highlight the name of the metro stations, the famous logo was called "bull's eye" until 1972. Its author remains unknown.   His source of inspiration a little less: in 1905, employees of the London buses wore a winged wheel on their caps; this disc symbolized the London General Omnibus Company. In 1913, the graphic designer Edward Johnston was commissioned to rework the logo; it modifies the proportions of the circle: the characters become bolder and the bar grows. The new design is registered in 1917 as a trademark. The logo survives the nationalization of 1947, it evolves over the years, is simplified, used on buses, without ever losing its soul. Beyond transport, it stands out as the obvious symbol of London, the best known and the most copied in the world. He even inspires pop culture. The world's first metro stationOn January 10, 1863, Londoners flock to discover a new means of transport that will radically change their lives: "the Tube". The Metroplitan Railways inaugurates the Metropolitan Line, an underground line run by a steam train that serves only two stations: Paddington (formerly Bishop's Road) and Farringdon. The world's first metro was born. It was built in record time, barely two and a half years. Success was not long in coming: 26,000 passengers made the daily trip between the two stations alone. Faced with this enthusiasm, the Metropolitan Railways opened new lines, District Line in 1868 and Circle Line in 1884. In 1890, it developed the first power lines in the world. Today, the "Tube" has eleven lines and 270 stations over 408 kilometers. It carries 3.37 million passengers per day. Long journeys, pay the right priceIf you're coming from Stonegate, East Sussex, and heading to the heart of the City's financial district, don't forget to pay for your ticket at the regulated fare. An attempted fraud could cost you your job. An official of the American fund BlackRock had to resign in 2014 for having used every day, for five years, a ticket at 7.20 pounds instead of the 21.50 pounds in force for his journey. His embezzlement reached the record amount of 43,000 pounds! Initially condemned to repay his debts, the financier was then the subject of an investigation by the FCA (Financial Conduct Authority), anxious to preserve the reputation of the City. Jonathan Paul Burrows was then banned from all financial functions until the end of his life. However, he can still take the metro ... as long as he pays the right price! The beating heart of LondonListed as a historic monument, Piccadilly Circus station housed works from the British Museum during World War II in order to protect them from bombardments. Located on the route of two underground lines, the Piccadilly Line and the Bakerloo Line, it has the particularity of being entirely underground, a rarity in the London network which, despite its underground name, is 55% above ground. Opened in 1906, redesigned by architect Charles Holden in 1926, Picadilly Circus was destroyed during the construction of Haymarket Street in the 1980s. Renovated in 2005-2007, it serves the historic heart of London, the famous Piccadilly Circus Square, known for its illuminated billboards and for its Critérion Theater. An old bunker for rentKitchens, a dining room, a narrow tub that would have belonged to Winston Churchill or even a telecommunications center, these are the historical vestiges of the disused station of Down Street. Opened in 1907 and closed to travelers in 1932 due to insufficient attendance, it was used as a bunker in Churchill during World War II. 25 employees of the former Prime Minister lived in these underground galleries. This unusual meeting place was a real place of safety when the bombs rained. Today, 400 square meters of this former station can be rented for 140,000 euros per year. From a shoe shop to a theater to a restaurant or a museum, a hundred projects have been submitted to bring Down Street to life. "Mind the gap", the eternal ritornelloThe metro has just stopped. The doors open. Then sounds the endless "Mind the gap between the train and the platform", "Watch out for the void between the train and the platform". Travelers waiting for the "tube" even see the phrase painted in capital letters on the floor. The message was created in 1968 to warn users of the danger associated with the risk of a gap between the platform and the wagon on curved stations. Incidents happen frequently. In 2004, more than 500 people were injured by falling on the tracks or being caught between the doors. The London Underground is riddled with traps for the novice: vertiginous escalators (avoid the stairs unless you are planning a marathon), directions, Northbound / Southbound and Eastbound / Westbound, capitals so as not to lose the north, and prices, variable depending on the number and proximity of the areas crossed.  

  • 0 London neighborhoods

    • by admin
    • 26-10-2020
    0.00 of 0 votes

    London has 33 boroughs, we suggest you take a quick look to familiarize yourself with the city: Whitehall and Westminster These two boroughs were for more than 1000 years, the center of the political and religious power of England. There is great wealth in terms of architecture and important monuments, which is not the case for some other areas of the city. During the week, the streets fill up with officials since the administrative offices are located in this area. To the north, Trafalgar Square marks the start of the West End, an area where the nightlife is very lively. Must-see visits to these neighborhoods are Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, Houses of Parliament and Westminster Cathedral. Piccadilly and St James'sThis is the main thoroughfare of the West End. During the 18th century, the district was surrounded by royal residences but was also the favorite place of courtesans who made their purchases there. The most exclusive area of ​​London remains Mayfair, located to the north. Piccadilly Circus marks the start of Soho. Soho and Trafalgar SquareBuilt at the end of the 17th century, it was London's most exclusive district for a hundred years. Subsequently, artists and intellectuals frequented its informal pubs. Today it is one of the most tolerant and multiracial areas in London. It is generally known for its Asian Chinatown district. Covent Garden and StrandIt is one of the liveliest areas of London where sidewalk cafes, street performers, luxury stores and fruit and vegetable markets delight tourists. At the heart of this district is Piazza Square, designed in 1630 by Iñigo Jones. When visiting Covent Garden, don't miss the square and its market. Bloomsbury and FitzroviaThis area corresponds to the residence of artists and writers. This district hosts many bookstores. In Bloomsbury you will also find the University of London, the British Museum and many Georgian squares. Holborn and Inns of CourtThis is the legal London, a district where journalists and lawyers were concentrated. Walking around, you can admire the Royal Courts of Justice and the Inns of Court (Lincoln’s Inn is steeped in history). It preserves buildings dating back to the 15th century, some of which escaped the great fire of 1666. Holborn was at another time an important shopping district. The CityAlthough this district has the full name of the City of London, everyone knows it as the City. This is the financial district of London, home to the Stock Exchange and the Bank of England. This is the place where the Romans originally settled. Following the Great Fire of 1666, which destroyed most of the early City, Christopher Wren oversaw the rebuilding of 52 churches in the area which still stand today. During the 19th century, it was part of one of the most popular residential areas, while very few people live there today. The city's current landscape is full of contrasts: there are modern bank buildings right next to Victorian-style buildings. Must-see sights in this area are St Paul's Cathedral, Tower of London and Tower Bridge. Smithfield and SpitalfieldsIt is certainly one of the most historic areas of London. Located north of the City, this district has served as a refuge for people who were not welcome in the current financial district. During the 17th century, the Huguenots and other immigrants from Europe and Bengal settled there by building factories and bringing their gastronomy and religion. This district is home to one of the oldest churches in the capital, a few Jacobin houses, remains of the Roman wall and the only wholesale food market in the city center. Southwark and BanksideFrom the Middle Ages until the 18th century, Southwark has been a very popular area free from City authorities. Indeed, at that time, many pleasures and entertainment were repressed and forbidden; that's why Southwark has served as a sort of outlet for some locals. The Globe Theater, which once housed Shakespeare's Troupe, has been rebuilt not far from its original location. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the area was crowded with warehouses and factories. Today, Southwark is one of London's most vibrant areas. In addition to this, you need to know more about it. South BankThis area was badly damaged by the bombings of the Second World War. In 1951, it was chosen to be the site of the Festival of Great Britain, which commemorated the centenary of the Great Exhibition. At present, the only building dating from 1951 still standing is the Royal Festival Hall. The London Eye, London's famous Ferris wheel, is located in the South Bank. ChelseaDuring Tudor times, Chelsea was a small village near the river which later became very busy. Henry VIII built a palace there which no longer exists today. Thomas More also lived in Chelsea and many artists drew their inspiration from the landscapes overlooking the river. In the 18th century, its gardens were home to many courtesans and the Chelsea Art Club organized dances considered scandalous for more than a century. In the 19th century, this district welcomed a lot of artists and intellectuals. At present, this is a very expensive area for artists. However, its link with the artistic world is maintained thanks to the many art galleries and antique stores located in the area. South Kensington and KnightsbridgeThey are among the most exclusive areas of London, where many consulates and embassies are located. The existence of Kensington Palace helps to preserve the original aspect of this district. In Knightsbridge you will find many luxury shops and a very affluent population. The area also has a strong cultural attraction since it hosts many museums as well as universities. Kensington y Holland ParkUntil 1830, the area was only a rural village made up of markets and large houses. One of the most famous buildings is Holland House, part of which is now Holland Park. Most of these buildings date back to the 19th century: two of these magnificent Victorian residences can be visited today. The northern and western parts of Kensington Gardens are luxurious residential areas, in which many foreign embassies have settled. Its stores are almost as luxurious as those in Knightsbridge. The main street, Queensway, is the preferred venue for meetings in clubs and cafes. Among the most interesting places are the Portobello Market, Nothing Hill and Holland Park. Regent's Park and MaryleboneMarylebone is an ancient medieval village located south of Regent's Park. It still preserves most of the Georgian mansions throughout the capital. Until the 18th century, this village was surrounded by fields and gardens. During the 19th century, the houses were mainly occupied by doctors. This district still retains all its elegance and this medical tradition. Greenwich and BlackheathGreenwich is basically known for being the place that defines the zero meridian. It is also the seat of the National Maritime Museum. During the Tudor era, a palace was erected but today only the Queen's House remains, built by Iñigo Jones for the wife of James I (James I). In Greenwich you can enjoy museums, bookshops, antique shops, markets and a park.

  • 0 London's 8 must-see streets

    • by admin
    • 25-10-2020
    0.00 of 0 votes

    London, THE place to be to learn pure English. A popular destination for immersion stays, the English capital with some 8 million inhabitants has not stolen its popularity (it is one of the top 10 most visited cities in the world). Besides a British accent that we all dream of having, you have every reason to choose London for your language study trip. Extremely rich in history, activities, cultures, you will never be bored during your free time in the capital city. Here is an overview of the 8 must-see neighborhoods in London that we strongly recommend you to visit. Beyond the language, strolling there will allow you to immerse yourself in the culture and atmosphere of London! 1. WestminsterWe start of course with the district of the Palace of Westminster. The scene of many of England’s historic events, here you have THE most symbolic monument in the country. The palace has 3 main towers including the famous 96-meter-high clock tower housing Big Ben. Also in the district are the cathedral and the abbey (where William of England married Kate Middleton making an entire nation of unhappy women dreaming of being the lucky one). As you stroll through Westminster, along the River Thames, it is in the heart of England's political history that you stroll. 2. The City This is the world famous London and European business district. A former Roman city, the City is now the geographic center of London. There is the legendary Tower of London, a historic fortress, not far from Tower Bridge and St Paul's Cathedral. You will come across a good number of businessmen in the City since the district, a veritable financial center, is home to the head offices of many multinational companies, newspapers, banks and insurance companies, not to mention the London Stock Exchange (London Stock Exchange) ; the City is the 3rd largest financial center in the world. 3. Soho / Covent GardenLocated in central London, north of Westminster, Soho is the place to go to have fun and see some of the most emblematic places of the capital: Piccadilly Circus, Oxford Street, Trafalgar Square, Leicester Square ... Soho is the district on more lively in the city and the place where bars, cinemas, restaurants, nightclubs, theaters come together… Soho is also Chinatown and the famous Regent Street, a must for shopping. Impossible to ignore this ultra trendy district where social diversity is king. East of Soho is Covent Garden. Famous for its square and its street performers who attract crowds of tourists, this is where the Royal Opera House, the Neal’s Yard, the London Transport Museum are located…. With its catering stands, gourmets will be able to indulge themselves. 4. Camden Town Ah Camden, the district of punks, political demands and rockstars! Located in North London, Camden is a district in its own right, with an incomparable atmosphere and symbol of alternative cultures ranging from rockers to alter-globalists. To make yourself look unlikely and extravagant, this is the place to go. With its young population, Camden Town is a place for parties and going out but is also famous for its markets. If you’re a vintage fan, this is where London’s biggest second-hand clothes market is located. Camden is the ultimate mix of genres! Trivial Info: Amy Winehouse lived there for a long time. 5. Chelsea / KensingtonHere we are in the beautiful neighborhoods. Chelsea and Kensington share a lot in common between a past as an arts center, Victorian houses, very pretty parks and chic shops. Welcome to the most bourgeois districts of London renowned for their calm and refinement. If you want a little greenery, take a stroll in the mythical Holland Park or the botanical garden of the Chelsea Physic Garden. Do not miss the museums that delight tourists: Science Museum, Natural History Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum… Obviously, the visit (of a part) of Kensington Palace, the royal palace where Princess Lady Di lived during 16 years old and where Prince William and his family live today, is a must. 6. Notting Hill Very close to Kensington and Chelsea is the district of Notting Hill, made particularly famous thanks to the film Love at first sight in Notting HIll with Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant. With its pastel-colored facades, this chic district transports us to another era, sweet and romantic. The Notting Hill Festival and its 3 mile parade, which takes place annually in August, is a major attraction in London. Naturally, you will have to walk the most famous street of the district called Portobello Road, if possible on Saturday, market day, to find vintage relics both in terms of furniture and clothing. Do not neglect Westbourne Grove and its cafes, boutiques and other addresses in a slightly more posh atmosphere. 7. GreenwichToo often overlooked by tourists obsessed with their photo with Big Bien, Greenwich is nevertheless worth a detour. With its Victorian and Georgian monuments, the architecture of this district is breathtaking. Along the Thames, the lined up boats give a village atmosphere as do its superb wooded parks and its famous market. 8. Mayfair One of the most chic districts of the capital. This is where the majestic Buckingham Palace is located and where tourists flock to witness the famous Changing of the Guard. In Mayfair, there are luxury hotels, private clubs and upscale restaurants. There is also Bond Street, the street of luxury boutiques, for shopping whose prices are rarely below 3 or 4 digits. You get it, London offers you a whole host of different atmospheres and settings. The city has an exciting cultural wealth that plunges us into the heart of London life. An ideal place to learn English and live the life of a true Briton.


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